NZ


Bune now ex-cyclone, still packing a punch

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WeatherWatch.co.nz believes that Bune is no longer a tropical cyclone based on latest predictions by the Joint Typhoon Warning Centre and latest satellite imagery.

Throughout Tuesday Bune has lost its eye with the bulk of the rain and cloud pushing to the southern half of the depression.


Cyclone Bune still Category 2

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Tropical Cyclone Bune still remains a dangerous category 2 cyclone this morning as the outer bands now reach East Cape and Gisborne - as mostly high cloud.


Cyclone Bune - Edge of eye passes over Raoul Island

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As of 10:30pm the weather station at Roul Island was no longer updating. Here is the 9:30pm update.

The air pressure has fallen to 974hPa, winds have all but stopped and the rain has eased to only light rain, following a rough couple of hours on the island.


Cyclone Bune still Cat 3 (+ Maps)

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Tropical Cyclone Bune remains a Category 3 status cyclone this afternoon with winds averaging around 120km/h.

It is expected to very slowly weaken into a Category 2 cyclone on Monday with sustained winds around 110km/h.

Latest satellite maps show the eye coming apart as the storm heads further south.


Increased thunderstorm risk this afternoon

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A few rumbles of thunder boomed across the Waikato yesterday but overall thunder activity was fairly low around New Zealand, however this afternoon the risk is slighly elevated as a cold front moves up the country.


Weather Video: Why nuclear fallout won't reach NZ via the sea

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Philip Duncan of WeatherWatch.co.nz explains why the sea currents are unlikely to bring radioactive material as far as New Zealand.

- WeatherWatch.co.nz / NZHerald.co.nz


PHOTOS (27) - Your Moon images

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The moon is currently the closest to earth in almost 20 years - here are the photos you've been sending in to us.


Equinox today - sun heads to Northern Hemisphere

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Today is the Autumnal Equinox and at lunchtime today the sun was directly over the equator - and for the next 6 months it will shine over the Northern Hemisphere for the majority of the time.

During summer the sun shines more over the Southern Hemisphere giving us summer and the Northern Hemisphere winter.


BLOG: What a gut-wrenching start to 2011

I have a very unscientific way of calculating the number of natural disasters in the world at any given time - my workload.  My role at WeatherWatch.co.nz isn't as straight forward as other weather forecasters - there is a heavy news element to it too.


Weather Video: Your Weekend Forecast

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See your weekend forecast plus the latest situation in Japan with Philip Duncan and NZHerald.co.nz.